Water Reservoir Sediment Removal

 ​Dredging, this is NOT our way of Sediment removal

 This process can’t be used in potable drinking water (Reservoir’s), it’s too muddy as particles are stirred up in Lakes and Reservoir’s they are becoming storage for sand dunes! 

The Sedimentation Process

 
Beneficial Uses of Dredged Material

What is Dredging?

 ​Dredging is necessary to maintain our nation's system of waterways. Nearly 400 million cubic yards of material is dredged each year. Consequently, about 400 million cubic yards of material must be placed in approved disposal sites or else used for another environmentally acceptable purpose. Finding and taking advantage of beneficial uses for dredged material makes good sense. 
 People have been dredging channels in one way or another since primitive people began to irrigate crops. Until the early 1900s the two most common types of mechanical dredges were dipper dredges and clamshell dredges. They are names for the type of scooping buckets they employ. Dredges were crude and barely effective in keeping channels and harbors clean. Keeping the dredge in position in the channel, knowing how deep a channel was being dug, and even making accurate surveys of the completed channel, were a mixture of art and science. Our new Submersible Sediment Removal System is a first of its kind. It employs new water flow technology, has the added advantage when linked with current O. T. C. electronics technologies of a large spectrum being useable at great depth or at long range and in a wide variety of industrial applications. After the initial excavation needed to establish a channel, the periodic dredging that must be done to keep it clear and maintain flow capacity, this is called maintenance.
 
Dredging is necessary to maintain our nation's system of waterways. Nearly 400 million cubic yards of material is dredged each year. Consequently, about 400 million cubic yards of material must be placed in approved disposal sites or else used for another environmentally acceptable purpose. Finding and taking advantage of beneficial uses for dredged material makes good sense.
 
  • It saves tax dollars that would otherwise be spent on finding and managing disposal sites.
  • It avoids habitat impacts that disposal may cause.
  • It saves capacity in existing disposal sites. 
  • It can be a low-cost alternative to purchasing expensive fill for construction projects.
  • It can be used to enhance or restore habitat.
     
 
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